Not seeing the forest for the trees

Truth be told, I am scared to write. I love creating images, I really fear writing. I sometimes get all caught up with making the "perfect" image that I lose sight of what the story is that goes behind it. Xiancun is an example of this. I am a photographer not a writer is what I am always saying. But to make it in this world of fast journalism and ever changing world events the written word is as important as a good or great image. In fact I think sometimes the word is paramount and the image is like the frosting on that chocolate cake you made and I have to say I love making the frosting more than the cake itself. Yet I am reminded of my shortcomings as a friend sent me a link to a blog site talking about  Adam Robert Young's experience with Xiancun. First of all I would like to say kudos to Adam Robert Young and his perspective on the Xiancun issue. Not only is his story strong but his pics dovetail very nicely with it.... This just reminds me to let go of my fears and face screen and blog with tenacity, zeal, and lots of chocolate!  An image is just an image but an image with a story behind it becomes an extraordinary moment. 

One of many migrant construction workers now living in Xiancun hauling rebar across the rubble of once was the hospital of Xiancun

One of many migrant construction workers now living in Xiancun hauling rebar across the rubble of once was the hospital of Xiancun

This vast area of empty land once belonged to the open market one of the first structures destroyed in Xiancun... in order to persuade the villagers to move. In the background is the elementary school of xiancun. Now parents take their children across town to an elementary school by  bus or metro.

This vast area of empty land once belonged to the open market one of the first structures destroyed in Xiancun... in order to persuade the villagers to move. In the background is the elementary school of xiancun. Now parents take their children across town to an elementary school by  bus or metro.